Caregiving

Tackling Hygiene: When Seniors Refuse to Bathe

Hygiene is important, but when your senior adult refuses to bathe or change their clothes, there can be many underlying reasons why. Learn how to tackle hygiene with this in-depth article.

Bathroom Safety Tips

The bathroom can be a treacherous place for many senior citizens. With hard, slippery surfaces and sharp corners, the risk of falling and being injured increases. The National Aging in Place Council has a few modifications they recommend to make the bathroom a senior-friendly environment.

Being a Caregiver

What is a caregiver? Should care be provided by a family member or a professional service? Where do I even start to look? Let this article from Hopkins Medicine answer all of your caregiver related questions.

How Senior Living Facilities are Changing with the TimesTop Tech Devices for Seniors

Developers of senior living communities are tasked with the challenge of anticipating the changing demands of their customers. As Americans age, so do their needs and preferences when it comes to senior living facilities. 

Top Tech Devices for Seniors

An elder care industry veteran offers her picks for must-have aging-in-place technology.

What is an ADL and Why Do They Matter?

Activities of daily living fall into six categories of basic skills needed to properly care for oneself. Each category is assessed for the ability to safely complete these tasks without direction, supervision or assistance.

Helping or Enabling: How to Tell if You’re Helping or Hurting

Most family caregivers want what is best for their loved ones, and they’ll do whatever it takes to make that happen. Unfortunately, discerning what’s best for a senior is often easier said than done. In many cases, a loved one’s own desired (or demands) may actually jeopardize their health, erode their independence and diminish their quality of life. Caregivers are left to walk a thin line.

7 Tech Devices for Elder Care

“We’re already seeing some really interesting ways technology is being used to help people as they age,” said Ben Jonash, and author of the Future of Aging be the Deloitte Center for Health Solutions.

Approaching End of Life Conversations

Talking about end-of-life wishes is one of the most important conversations to have because it’s not actually about dying.

Why do Seniors with Dementia Wander?

“Discovering the triggers for wandering is not always easy, but they can provide insights to dealing with the behavior.”

Patients Want a Good Death at Home

Surveys show dying at home is what most Americans say they want. But it’s “not all it’s cracked up to be,” said Johnston, a caregiver advocate and writer from Atlanta.

Senior Living Industry Needs to Reposition to Attract Employees

Aegis President, Engskov, does not believe that senior living as a whole has been effective in reaching millennials and other young workers, to promote the career opportunities available in this richly mission-driven field.

Parenting Parents When They Don’t Want Help

David Solie’s 89-year-old mother, Carol, was unyielding. “No, I will not move,” she told her son every time he suggested that she leave her home and relocate to a senior living residence. And it didn’t stop there.

A Doctor Gets a Look at What’s Missing From Health Care

Although Kleinman’s speciality is studying how patients experience illness, he wasn’t prepared for the roller coaster of family caregiving.

Intimate Lessons From Family Caregivers

What emotional and practical challenges do family caregivers face as they undertake these responsibilities? How do they cope with changing relationships, financial burdens and the distress that serious illness often provokes?

Why Owning a Pet is Good for Your Health

Owning a pet can be both mentally and physically beneficial for people of any age, but especially older people. Just spending a brief time with an animal sets off a chemical reaction in the brain.

Imagine a Peace Corps of Caregivers

Imagine a government program that would mobilize volunteers to help older adults across the nation age in place. One is on the way.

Your Role as a Primary Caregiver

Caregiving often creeps up on you. You start by dropping by your mom’s house and doing her laundry, or taking yo9ur dad to a doctor’s appointment. Gradually, you are doing more and more. AT some point, you realize you have made a commitment to take care of someone else.